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The Intellectual Activist

By Peter Schwartz

 

The author of these articles is Peter Schwartz. They were originally published in The Intellectual Activist (TIA) between 1979 and 1991. In converting the articles to works for sale, the Ayn Rand Institute has done only minimal formatting, retaining as much, if not all, of the flavor of the original piece as possible.


Vol. 1, No. 1 contains the following:

"Deregulation Comes to Broadcasting”: The move to take away the FCC’s powers–and why the “consumerists” are opposed to it. This issue also contains a “Statement of Purpose.”

Publication date: October 1, 1979


Vol.1, No. 2 contains the following:

“Cutting Down the FTC”: the FTC’s attempt to ban TV commercials aimed at children. The government as parent? “Legal Trends”: Government expropriation of private land; a suit claiming that technology is not in the “public interest”; a surprising anti-trust ruling.

Publication date: October 15, 1979


Vol.1, No. 3 contains the following:

“Oil, Profits and Demagoguery”: The distorted coverage of oil company profits and rising gasoline prices.

“Demagoguery, Part 2”: The “windfall profits” tax and the Carter administration’s anti-energy policy.

Publication date: November 1, 1979


Vol.1, No. 4 contains the following:

“Lawyers as Public Servants”: a proposal to make “pro bono” work a legal requirement for all lawyers. “An Energy Story the Press Hasn’t Told”: why the news media always depict Mobil Oil as a villain and Ralph Nader as a hero.

Publication date: November 15, 1979


Vol.1, No. 5 contains the following:

“Standing Up to the FTC”: the FTC goes after businessman Joe Sugarman—who fights back and goes after the FTC. “Postscript to Herb Schmertz”: Mobil Oil’s vice president takes a leave of absence—to work on Edward Kennedy’s presidential campaign.

Publication date: December 1, 1979


Vol.1, No. 6 contains the following:

“Subsidizing Ideas”: the advertising industry produces a tax-supported, “non-partisan” explanation of inflation. “Energy Mobilization Board”: government’s control over all energy production. “New Frontier for the FCC”: forcing broadcasters to devote a certain amount of air time to educating children.

Publication date: December 15, 1979


Vol.1, No. 7 contains the following:

“Gasoline Rationing”: discouraging production and making the government the ultimate distributor of all gasoline. “Selectively Applied Rights”: the presumption of innocence for terrorists—and of guilt for businessmen.

Publication date: January 1, 1980


Vol.1, No. 8 contains the following:

“Moscow Olympics”: the Soviet “cleanup” campaign for its Potemkinized Olympic Village. “Budget Balancing”: the virtues—and flaws of the balanced-budget movement. “Gold Standard”: the gold bandwagon gains political respectability. “Appeasement in Iran”: how U.S. foreign policy permitted an unarmed Iranian mob to capture a well-fortified American embassy.

Publication date: February 1, 1980


Vol. 1, No. 9 contains the following:

“FCC Shows Its Powers”: broadcasters discover how easily their licenses can be removed by the FCC. “Tests and Racism”: a suit to disqualify a police aptitude test because an insufficient quota of blacks passes it. “Progress Report”: an update on subjects covered in past issues of TIA.

Publication date: February 15, 1980


Vol. 1, No. 10 contains the following:

“Price Controls”: support for price controls grows—among people who oppose it in principle. “Paternalism of the FTC”: “protecting” the people from honest advertising.

Publication date: March 1, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 11 contains the following:

“Carter’s Budget: Illusions and Realities”: There is more, and less, to the President’s budget that meets the eye. “The Draft”: The liberal-conservative coalition to revive military conscription.

Publication date: April 1, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 12 contains the following:

“The US and the Shah . . .”: Why the left condones Iran and blames America for the hostage crisis. “. . . and the Ayatolla . . .”: Why there is little outcry against a full-fledged dictator, and if he happens to be anti-American. “. . .and the President”: Jimmy Carter’s policy of conciliation toward the irrational thugs holding our embassy..

Publication date: April 15, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 13 contains the following:

“Oil and Inflation”: The disingenuous attempt to blame inflation on OPEC—and to pretend to fight inflation by forbidding consumption. “Doomsday and Inflation”: The new ecological explanation for inflation: “the new overburdening of biological systems.” “History Lesson”: A history professor urges us to applaud Soviet tyranny for keeping nations at peace.

Publication date: May 1, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 14 contains the following:

“Cuba’s Boat People”: The blatant double standard in the journalistic portrayals of life under socialism. “Businessmen and Capitalism”: How cowardly capitalists support their self-avowed intellectual enemies. “DOE Is Watching”: The Energy Department’s plan to control the number of days that people may work.

Publication date: May 15, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 15 contains the following:

“Currency Controls”: The government wants greater power to regulate people’s travel. “Reining in COWPS”: Trying to reduce the authority of the Council on Wage and Price Stability. “America and Iran”: Questions and answers on America’s moral obligations toward Iran.

Publication date: June 1, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 16 contains the following:

“A Small Voice for Freedom”: A 12-year-old boy fights to be allowed to stay out of Russia—and is opposed by the American Civil Liberties Union. “The First Amendment and the SEC”: All the financial news the SEC deems fit to print.

Publication date: June 15, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 17 contains the following:

“The Reindustrialization Juggernaut”: How the planners want to “reindustrialize” through a business-labor-government “partnership.” “The Foreign Lesson”: What is to be learned from the economic success of Japan and West Germany.

Publication date: July 1, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 18 contains the following:

“Immigrants and Work Cards”: Making businessmen hire only government-approved workers. “Defense and Energy”: Conservatives join the call for energy controls—in the name of “national security.” “Gold Standard”: A bill to repeal the legal tender laws.

Publication date: July 15, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 19 contains the following:

“The New Health Planners”: Their solution to high medical costs: get rid of “surplus” doctors. “The Presidential Candidates”: A brief look at Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan. “Gold and Rights”: A de jure vs. a de facto gold standard.

Publication date: August 1, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 20 contains the following:

“The Election Message”: Was Jimmy Carter done in by uncontrollable circumstances—or by his fundamental ideas? “The Post-Election Threat”: The antagonism of the religious right toward true individual rights. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: September 1, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 21 contains the following:

“The Crumbling of COWPS”: Intellectual and popular support collapses for Carter’s “voluntary” price and wage controls. “The New Right”: George Gilder’s preposterous idea that capitalism is built upon faith and altruism. “The Chrysler Lesson”: How the “reindustrialization” of Chrysler has fared. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: September 15, 1980



Vol. 1, No. 22 contains the following:

“The Hostage Surrender”: Treating the Iranian mobs as if they were civilized people. “Production and Poverty”: Environmentalists use the fact of present and future material progress to justify their doomsday predictions. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: October 1, 1980



Vol. 2, No. 1 contains the following:

“Global 2000”: Environmentalism as the means of preventing a Third World uprising. “Ecological refugees” and the tyranny of “soil degradation.” “Minds and Guns”: The subtle political pressures affecting the content of TV programs. “Progress Report”: An update of various topics covered in TIA. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: October 15, 1980



Vol. 2, No. 2 contains the following:

“Plumbing the Depths . . .”: Socializing the oceans by declaring their mineral wealth to be “the common heritage of mankind.” “. . . and Rock-Bottom”: “Law of the Sea Treaty”: Pragmatic capitalists are intellectually overwhelmed by principled socialists. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: November 1, 1980



Vol. 2, No. 3 contains the following:

“Guns and Knee-Jerkism”: Why liberals show greater antagonism toward guns than toward murderers. The crime of disarming the victim. “Criminal Injustice”: Why a proper criminal justice system cannot exist within a welfare state. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: November 15, 1980



Vol. 2, No. 4 contains the following:

“Infant Formula and Exploitation”: Why the left wants to prohibit the marketing of a life-saving product in undeveloped countries. “News and Exploitation”: The New World Information Order—the Third World demands its “fair share” of media coverage. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: June 1, 1981



Vol. 2, No. 5 contains the following:

“Avant-Garde Jurisprudence”: How voluntary confessions to murder become “involuntary” in today’s courtrooms. “Postal Theory”: An official of the Letter Carriers Union offers a revealingly convoluted defense of the government’s monopoly. “Infant Formula”: Why capitalist infant formula is denounced as lethal, while socialist infant formula is regarded as healthful.

Publication date: June 15, 1981



Vol. 2, No. 6 contains the following:

“Unions and Violence”: The prevalence of union violence—and the courts’ tacit approval of it. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: July 1, 1981



Vol. 2, No. 7 contains the following:

“Moscow’s Show Books”: The Kremlin’s motive in staging a book fair in a society where there exists no freedom to read. “FTC vs. Advertising”: The FTC’s attempts to make ads discourage the purchase of goods. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: August 1, 1981



Vol. 2, No. 8 contains the following:

“Business’ New Burden”: The Administration looks for surrogate shoulders to take up the social-welfare burden. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: August 15, 1981



Vol. 2, No. 9 contains the following:

“The Wages of Sex”: Feminism’s new campaign for “comparable worth.” Should employers be prohibited from paying secretaries less than truck drivers? “Neuterism: The Ultimate Egalitarianism”: The rampant anti-individualism of the women’s movement. Its insistence upon a collective equality of condition between the sexes. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: September 1, 1981



Vol. 2, No. 10 contains the following:

“Fighting Crime . . .”: The Administration’s desperately needed proposals to amend the exclusionary rule and to eliminate lenient bail and parole practices. “ . . . And Its Fellow-Travelers”: The liberal response to the government’s battle against crime: make love, not war. “Russia’s Silent Dissidents”: Underground entrepreneurs who defy the Soviet State. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: September 15, 1981



Vol. 2, No. 11 contains the following:

“Energy ‘Emergency’”: The conservatives’ call for “emergency” controls. Defending freedom as long as it doesn’t conflict with anything important. “Crime and Prison”: The opposition to building more prisons to alleviate overcrowded cells, on the grounds that new space will be quickly filled up. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: October 1, 1981



Vol. 2, No. 12 contains the following:

“The Stockman ‘Trojan Horse’”: The hostile, dishonest attacks on David Stockman. How the charges contradict the very theme of the famed Atlantic article. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: November 15, 1981



Vol. 2, No. 13 contains the following:

““The Stockman ‘Trojan Horse,’ part 2”: Did Stockman surreptitiously reprogram OMB’s computer to yield favorable conclusions? Keynesianism in, Keynesianism out. “Airwave Deregulation”: The FCC makes a startling proposal to abolish the Fairness Doctrine and the Equal Time Rule. “Postscript”: Working women and antediluvian employers: how a free market discourages irrational discrimination. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: November 15, 1981



Vol. 2, No. 14 contains the following:

“The Polish Illusion”: Why the military crackdown was so unanticipated by Solidarity. The belief that Socialism can tolerate small doses of freedom. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: December 1, 1981



Vol. 2, No. 15 contains the following:

“Reflections on Ayn Rand”: A brief tribute to man’s great idealizer, who identified the “Atlas” upon whose shoulders the world rests. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: March 15, 1982



Vol. 2, No. 16 contains the following:

“The Polish Illusion cont’d”: America’s State Department is repeating Solidarity’s philosophical error—with much less excuse. “Sticks and Carrots”: Using the carrot of Western loans to induce Soviet “moderation”: a new protection-money racket. “Legislative Monitor”: Three pending issues calling for letters to Congress: the balanced budget amendment, reform of the exclusionary rule, and the IRS’s attempt to intimidate tax protesters. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: April 23, 1982



Vol. 2, No. 17 contains the following:

“Sticks and Carrots, cont’d”: Why is a policy of détente senseless toward common criminals, yet desirable toward criminal governments? This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: May 27, 1982



Vol. 2, No. 18 contains the following:

““The Nuclear Freezers”: The “peace” movement that included the world’s most brutal tyrants—the PLO, the IRA, the FALN, the Communist Party—cannot have peace as its goal. “Interview with Leonard Peikoff”: TIA interviews Dr. Peikoff about his thirty-one years of close association with the late Ayn Rand, including his first impressions of her and his reaction to the hostility toward her ideas. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: June 30, 1982



Vol. 2, No. 19 contains the following:

“Supply-Side Populism”: Why supply-side economics is incompatible with a free-market philosophy. How it panders to anti-capitalist prejudices while seeking to expand government. “Explaining the Inexplicable, a book review of The Ominous Parallels": understanding what turned a civilized nation into the barbarous Third Reich—and whether it can happen here. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: August 23, 1982



Vol. 2, No. 20 contains the following:

“A Freedom-Fighter vs. The Freedom Fighters”: A 14 year-old boy battles his parents and the ACLU to keep from being returned to Soviet totalitarianism. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: September 8, 1982



Vol. 3, No. 1 contains the following:

“Nuclear Arms: A Defense”: The deadly fallacies—both ideological and military—of the nuclear freeze movement. The myth of “overkill.” The shocking absence of a U.S. nuclear defense. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: October 21, 1982



Vol. 3, No. 2 contains the following:

“Nuclear Arms: A Defense, part 2”: Why the concept of military sufficiency is a philosophical, rather than technical, issue. The irrationality of Mutual Assured Destruction. “The Andropov Mystique”: Is Yuri Andropov a “closet liberal”? The philosophical premise that makes Andropov’s jazz collection important news to journalists. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: November 15, 1982



Vol. 3, No. 3 contains the following:

“The Social Security Portent”: The Social Security system is a microcosm of the welfare state, where all feed off all. The only solution: a private and voluntary system. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: Dcember 1, 1982



Vol. 3, No. 4 contains the following:

“Nuclear Arms: A Defense, part 3”: The alarming trend toward the Finlandization of the West. The fundamental moral distinction—evaded by arms-controllers—between U.S. and Soviet weapons. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: December 24, 1982



Vol. 3, No. 5 contains the following:

“Nuclear Arms: A Defense, part 4”: The insanity of arms negotiations with the very enemy that makes those arms necessary. Why any agreement with a totalitarian state is inherently unverifiable. Why peace is not a value to Moscow. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: January 15, 1983



Vol. 3, No. 6 contains the following:

“Reagan at Midterm: Requiem for a Lightweight”: The monumental failure of the Reagan Administration. Its bold free-market rhetoric—combined with timid, compromising action. “Inflation Alert”: Top corporate officials urge the government to solve economic problems by inflating the money supply. “The Media-Mind”: Why elections which black candidates narrowly lose are depicted as examples of racism, while elections in which they gain 97% of all black votes are not. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: March 7, 1983



Vol. 3, No. 7 contains the following:

“Reagan at Midterm: Requiem for a Lightweight, part 2”: Why Reagan stands for no ideology. How his failure to put capitalism into practice stems from his failure to grasp capitalism in theory. “The Attack on Defense”: Reagan's proposal of space-based defense is opposed on political grounds—in the guise of attacks on its technological feasibility. “Legislative Monitor”: Four pending issues calling for your letters: the false alternatives on abortion; restraining the IRS; China redefined as “non-Communist”; freeing the airwaves. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: April 18, 1983



Vol. 3, No. 8 contains the following:

“The Flat Tax Diversion”: Giving the IRS greater access to private income through the diversionary sop of (temporarily) lower tax rates. Why rates should not be flattened until the size of government is drastically shrunk. “The Media-Mind”: Why people are not informed that the Pentagon spends less than the Dept. of Health and Human Services. And does Moscow influence the freeze movement? This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: June 9, 1983



Vol. 3, No. 9 contains the following:

“Unisexism”: The new feminist campaign to have the government dictate which facts about sex—from life expectancy to physiology—one may and may not take cognizance of. “Capitalism’s Enemies’ Strange Friends”: The cowardly pragmatism exhibited by big business in financially supporting anti capitalist movements. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: July 29, 1983



Vol. 3, No. 10 contains the following:

“An Appeal to Our Readers”: TIA engages in intellectual activism by taking out a full-page ad in the New York Times, which urges the severing of all ties between the United States and the U.S.S.R. in the wake of the Korean Air Lines massacre. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: September 14, 1983



Vol. 3, No. 11 contains the following:

“The Primacy of Diplomacy”: Why the liberals react to Moscow’s shooting down of the KAL plane by encouraging negotiation to foster “understanding.” “The Primacy of Eclecticism”: Reagan describes the massacre as an act of barbarians . . . then calls for the continuation of normal diplomatic relations with Russia. “The Primacy of Ideology”: The appropriate policy toward the Soviet Union: break all cultural, scientific, economic and diplomatic ties. The need to stop granting moral respectability to an immoral state. “Grenada: Right Practice, Wrong Theory”: Reagan’s single foreign policy success—for which he was incapable of providing the correct justification. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: December 6, 1983



Vol. 3, No. 12 contains the following:

“The Times Goes to War”: The message of the TV movie The Day After and the meaning of the press’s opposition to the Grenada invasion: war is hell; ideology is irrelevant. “Carterizing Lebanon”: Reagan sends marines to Lebanon—with unloaded weapons and with orders not to fight back. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: January 11, 1984



Vol. 3, No. 13 contains the following:

“The Education Principle”: Egalitarianism as the underlying philosophy of the public education system. How the schools penalize the intelligent, motivated schoolchildren. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: February 8, 1984



Vol. 3, No. 14 contains the following:

“Altruism and the First Amendment”: Why an investment newsletter, designed strictly to inform people on how to make money, is not regarded by liberals as sufficiently public-spirited to warrant First Amendment protection. “Budget Facts”: The myth of the Reagan tax cuts and the illusion of the Reagan defense buildup. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: March 31, 1984



Vol. 3, No. 15 contains the following:

“Reagan In China: Ideas . . .”: Reagan visits so-called Communist China to promote capitalism—and has his remarks about the free market censored by the government. “. . . And Consequences”: Reagan’s pro-China policy leads to a denial of political asylum to a Chinese refugee fleeing totalitarianism. “Olympics and Moscow”: Why the Soviets stayed away from the Olympics: their fear of mass defections. “The Media-Mind”: How the press buries the facts about Moscow’s public approval of the downing of the KAL plane. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: May 10, 1984



Vol. 3, No. 16 contains the following:

“Eminent Domain’s Portent”: A Hawaiian law, which expropriates private land on the ground that the owner has too much property, is declared constitutional by the Supreme Court. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: July 26, 1984



Vol. 3, No. 17 contains the following:

“Presidential Debate”: Each candidate tries to prove that he is more religious and more altruistic than the other. “The 1984 Presidential Choice”: In the campaign between Mondale and Reagan, the lesser of two evils is the choice not to vote. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: October 17, 1984



Vol. 3, No. 18 contains the following:

““Church and State”: The Catholic bishops attack capitalism. The inescapable connection between religion and statism. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: December 31, 1984



Vol. 3, No. 19 and 20 contains the following:

“Libertarianism: The Perversion of Liberty, parts 1 and 2”: A penetrating exposé of Libertarianism. The philosophical vacuum that makes Libertarianism anti-liberty. The impossibility of defending—or even defining—freedom without a system of ethics. Libertarianism’s rejection of the need to validate liberty, and its repudiation of values and morality as such. The basic ideological similarities between Libertarianism and the New Left. Why Libertarians support the PLO, condemn America as “imperialistic” and view Russia as having a “peaceful” foreign policy. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: May 10, 1985



Vol. 4, No. 1 contains the following:

“Reagan’s Unraveling”: How the congressional dismantling of Reagan’s defense build-up represents merely a reaping of what the president has long been sowing. “Libertarianism: The Perversion of Liberty, part 3”: The amoralism of Libertarianism, as evidenced in its anti-concept of “non-interventionism.” Why anarchism is integral to Libertarianism. The movement’s root: nihilism. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: June 25, 1985



Vol. 4, No. 2 contains the following:

“America Hijacked”: Why our inability to deter terrorism reflects intellectual, not military, impotence. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: July 19, 1985



Vol. 4, No. 3 contains the following:

“The Summit Message”: Why moral egalitarianism is the precondition of U.S.-Soviet summit meetings and arms-control talks. “Libertarianism: The Perversion of Liberty, part 4”: The false distinction between “good” and “bad” Libertarians. Why the repudiation of any need to justify liberty is the repudiation of liberty itself. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: December 4, 1985



Vol. 4, No. 4 contains the following:

“Untangling South Africa”: The individualist vs. collectivist view of racism. Why liberals actually endorse racist premises. Capitalism as the only solution to apartheid. “The Media-Mind”: How the press discredits the Strategic Defense Initiative by portraying supporters as unrealistic “ideologues.” This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: January 20, 1986



Vol. 4, No. 5 contains the following:

“The Manila-Managua Divergence”: How a dictatorship elicits greater tolerance by liberals if it is ideologically committed to America’s destruction. “Foreign Policy and the Morality of Self-Interest, Part 1”: The purpose of a foreign policy as analogous to that of a criminal code. The central value, and the central virtue, of a proper foreign policy. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: March 24, 1986



Vol. 4, No. 6 contains the following:

“Puff-Balling Libya”: Why Reagan’s raid against Khadafy was far too mild and appeasing. “Foreign Policy and the Morality of Self-Interest, Part 2”: How to protect against the Soviet threat. How to deal with anti-communist authoritarian regimes. The nature of U.S. self-interest in the Middle East, Western Europe, and Central America. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: January 29, 1986



Vol. 4, No. 7 contains the following:

“The Tax-Reform Threat”: The drastic expansion of government power—under the guise of “fairness” in tax reform. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: June 26, 1986



Vol. 4, No. 8 contains the following:

“The Supreme Court vs. Rights”: Two appalling decisions attacking the principle of individual rights: one, upholding “affirmative action”; the other, endorsing regulation of private sexual conduct. “Postscript on Libertarianism”: answers to readers’ questions, such as the difference between Republican and Libertarian candidates, and the impossibility of assessing Libertarianism’s conclusions while ignoring its premises. “A Response”: Why the methodology of The Passion of Ayn Rand is unremittingly non-objective.

Publication date: August 20, 1986



Vol. 4, No. 9 contains the following:

“The Moral Education: From Daniloff . . .”: Reagan’s concession of U.S.-Soviet moral equivalence in the “trade” of a Soviet spy for an imprisoned U.S. journalist. “. . . To Reykjavik”: The far broader concession of moral equivalence in the administration’s embrace of arms control “trades.” This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: October 23, 1986



Vol. 4, No. 10 contains the following:

“The Iran Scandal”: The suicidal policy of trying to buy Iran’s good will by selling weapons to its “moderates”—and the parallels to arms-control deals with Moscow. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: January 22, 1987



Vol. 4, No. 11 contains the following:

“Amerika vs. America”: The false message and the insipid hash conveyed by the ideologically non-ideological movie Amerika. “Bridges or Fences”: The lesson of the bugging of the U.S. embassy in Moscow: the goals of building bridges and building fences are incompatible. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: April 17, 1987



Vol. 4, No. 12 contains the following:

“Diplomatizing the Military”: How America’s pragmatic foreign policy led to the deaths of thirty-seven seamen aboard the frigate Stark in the Persian Gulf. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: May 5, 1987



Vol. 4, No. 13 contains the following:

“The Bork Philosophy”: Judge Robert Bork’s judicial philosophy: the irrelevance of all principles, including the principle of individual rights, to constitutional questions. “Secularism and Public Schools”: A lengthy analysis on the movement to impart religious beliefs through the public education system. The perverse attempt to paint creationism as science and secularism as religion. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: October 14, 1987



Vol. 4, No. 14 contains the following:

“Moralism and Arms Control”: The basic purpose of agreements like the INF Treaty: not the elimination of weapons, but the destruction of moral standards by which to distinguish America from Russia. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: March 28, 1988



Vol. 4, No. 15 contains the following:

“The Middle East Victim”: Why in the Middle East conflict it is the Israelis who are in fact the victims and the Palestinians who are the brutal oppressors. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: March 31, 1988



Vol. 4, No. 16 contains the following:

“Moral Cave-In”: Why Reagan’s decision to offer compensation to the Iranians for those shot down by the Vincennes represents a moral concession to savage irrationality. We the Living: The historical background and movie review of the newly restored film version of Ayn Rand’s novel We the Living. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: August 17, 1988



Vol. 4, No. 17 contains the following:

“Yellowstone’s Fire-Fuelers”: How environmentalism’s hostility toward the man-made barred people from fighting the Yellowstone Park fires. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: October 7, 1988



Vol. 4, No. 18 contains the following:

“The ‘Anti-Liberal’ Campaign”: How the presidential race represents a rejection of the “liberal” label—but an embrace of liberalism’s substance. “Is Liberalism Dead?”: The pragmatic attempts to make liberalism “work” by putting it in non-ideological packaging. “The Presidential Candidates”: The Dukakis-Bush campaign as a hopeless choice between a more competent version of Jesse Jackson and a more altruistic version of Ronald Reagan. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: November 11, 1988



Vol. 4, No. 19 contains the following:

“Metaphysics and the PLO”: The philosophic premise allowing our State Department to declare that terrorists are suddenly peace-lovers. “Atlas Shrugs, Feebly, In California”: The Nader-backed drive to destroy California’s insurance business, and the companies’ feeble efforts to defend their right to exist. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: December 30, 1988



Vol. 4, No. 20 contains the following:

“On Sanctioning the Sanctioners”: Why those who knowingly support enemies of reason and capitalism should themselves be deemed enemies. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: February 27, 1989



Vol. 5, No. 1 contains the following:

“On Moral Sanctions”: Why the irrational survives only by feeding off the efforts, and the “tolerance,” of the rational. The implications with respect to cooperating with Libertarianism. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: May 18, 1989



Vol. 5, No. 2 contains the following:

“The Value of the Flag”: Flag-burning and individual rights. The need not for subjective tolerance of all views, but for the objective commitment to the absolution of rational moral principles. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: July 17, 1989



Vol. 5, No. 3 contains the following:

“Voluntary Servitude”: Congress attempts to compel “voluntary service”—as payment for living in a free country. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: November 17, 1989



Vol. 5, No. 4 contains the following:

“Lithuania’s Plight”: The betrayal of Lithuania for the sake of Soviet “stability.” “The Rushdie Surrender”: Craven helplessness (with some exceptions) by America and the West in standing up to threats of censorship and murder from a medieval tyranny. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: April 30, 1990



Vol. 5, No. 5 contains the following:

“Missing Principles on Iraq”: America’s compromising appeasement which encouraged Saddam Hussein’s brutality. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: October 17, 1990



Vol. 5, No. 6 contains the following:

“A Final Announcement”: On TIA’s closing, and its re-opening in a new format. “U.S. Interests in the Persian Gulf”: The dichotomy between our clearly defined, successful military operations and our indecisive, self-contradictory foreign-policy goals in the Persian Gulf War. This issue also contains short notes.

Publication date: August 30, 1991

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